The Unspoken Deal

Once upon a time, a few hundred years ago, there was an unspoken deal.

You see, for every one hundred people in any population, about 60 were able to sing very well. But the unspoken deal was that only about 5 or 6 WOULD be singers. The rest would enjoy life as shopkeepers, blacksmiths, doctors and priests. Or as many other things.In that way, for evey 95 people there would be five lovely concerts from 5 singers who had chosen to be singers.

 

Then came the Industrial Revolution which developed Mass Production and the Age of the Machine and many many jobs became tedious and soulless. So, perhaps it isn’t a surprise that all 60 per 100 of population eventually decided that singing would be a far more fun profession. This happened in acting too. And film making, and painting.

 

So large numbers of people who could sing, decided to do that instead.

 

for singers went down and soon there were too many singers, singing full or part time, doing singing courses, and not  enough audience. No one earned enough money and the few original singers seethed and bemoaned this flooding of their profession becoming very competitive and cynical in the process, often setting up singing schools and academies of their own.

 

In some towns, like Brighton, there were also many bored people who couldn’t sing to save their lives. But this didn’s stop them spending their money on courses at the new singing academies, flooding the singing world even further. Some even invented new genres of singing to justify their lack of talent. In Brighton, for every 100 people, 80 were singers of one kind or another.

 

And they all lived unhappily ever after.

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